Global Outlook: Contemporary Peace Research and Practice

Curated expert opinion on intractable contemporary issues

Global Outlook: Contemporary Peace Research and Practice

Afghanistan: Where Imperial Hubris Goes to Die

By Ramesh Thakur  |  01 May, 2021

In 2009, as I gazed at the gaping hillside holes in Bamiyan where once two imposing Buddha statues had stood as silent sentinels for more than 1,500 years, two emotions were dominant. The first was the internalisation of the northern limits of India’s borders in the ebb and flow of history. The second was sadness at the cultural vandalism of religious fanatics, little knowing that 11 years later, the UK and US would themselves be consumed with the destruction of statues honouring historical figures based on a Manichean reinterpretation of the past through the prism of current faddish morality.

Arms for Peace? The Risks of the “European Peace Facility”

By Martina Fischer  |  28 April, 2021

On March 22, 2021, the Council of the European Union adopted an agreement on the European Peace Facility“ (EPF), a new instrument established by the member states of the European Union, which aims to support activities in the framework of the “Common Security and Defence Policy”.

China’s Geopolitical Reach Extends to Iran and Could Embrace Afghanistan

By Ramesh Thakur  |  20 April, 2021

After an attack on its main nuclear facility in Natanz on 11 April, very likely by Israel, President Hasan Rouhani said that Iran will begin enriching uranium to 60 per cent. From a technical point of view, that would put Iran within a short sprint to full-fledged weapon-grade (90 per cent) of uranium enrichment.

In Support for Myanmar’s Democracy, Conditions Apply

By Ramesh Thakur  |  15 April, 2021

Myanmar has a history of coups and long periods of military rule. The depth, size and persistence of the protests means a return to civilian control of the government is not an impossibility, but the legacy of past military brutality means indefinite junta rule is also possible.

Myanmar Pleads for the World to Honour the Responsibility to Protect

By Ramesh Thakur  |  07 April, 2021

This is not an article I had expected, intended or wanted to write. I have politely declined requests to write on the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) in relation to the current crisis in Myanmar and the climbing civilian death toll. The turning point was visuals of people with R2P banners, T-shirts, umbrellas and candle-lit vigils, as in the photo accompanying this article. The images have touched my conscience and should pull at the world’s conscience.

Myanmar’s Deadly Coup and the Responsibility to Protect

By Simon Adams  |  30 March, 2021

On Friday, 5 March, as the UN Security Council was meeting in its solemn chamber in New York, people across Myanmar held peaceful vigils to protest against the bloody reimposition of military rule in their country. Despite a strict night-time curfew, protesters came into the streets of Yangon and Mandalay to write “We Need R2P” and “R2P – Save Myanmar” in candlelight.

The views and opinions expressed in Global Outlook are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Toda Peace Institute.