Global Outlook: Peace and Security in Northeast Asia

Curated expert opinion on intractable contemporary issues

Global Outlook: Peace and Security in Northeast Asia

Why Pyongyang Won’t Pursue Dialogue with US

By Chung-in Moon  |  14 July, 2021

Given North Korea’s stronger nuclear arsenal, the pervasiveness of anti-North Korean sentiment in the US, and the intensifying rivalry between the US and China, another North Korean nuclear crisis at this point might not be manageable.

Four Idols of South Korea-US Alliance Advocates

By Chung-in Moon  |  16 June, 2021

The South Korea-US summit on May 21 came to a successful conclusion. It served as an opportunity for making the two countries’ alliance more reciprocal and comprehensive.

Balancing Act in Asia

By Herbert Wulf  |  26 May, 2021

Even before the new US administration has sorted its political priorities—a necessity after four erratic Trump years—it is already forced to show the flag on foreign policy. Recently, the war between Israel and Hamas, at the same time the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, the complicated relationship with Russia, the dysfunctional relations within NATO, the sensitivities of the German government resulting from disagreements over the North Stream 2 gas pipeline, and so on.

Three Puzzles in South Korean Diplomacy Discourse

By Chung-in Moon  |  26 April, 2021

South Korea must keep a strong alliance with the US and maintain a strategic partnership with China.

Japan’s Critical Role in Building Stable Peace in Northeast Asia

By Kevin P. Clements  |  05 April, 2021

President Trump’s confrontational “Make America Great Again” foreign policy put the United States and its allies on a collision course with each other and with China. It focused far too much diplomatic and public attention on US-China competition and eroded the liberal world order by creating a situation whereby the US itself began questioning its value. It also gave little support to nations and allies interested in finding inclusive solutions to tackle global problems by pitching countries as “for” or “against” major powers. In short, it did little for the advancement of our common interests and generated high levels of mistrust and unpredictability.

The Three Competing Viewpoints in Biden Administration’s Potential North Korea Policy

By Chung-in Moon  |  12 December, 2020

With the inauguration of Joe Biden as the next American president all but certain, the eyes of the world are once again turning to the US. People are speculating about the policy line to be adopted by Biden, who has promised to value American alliances and restore multilateralism in the international community in a departure from Donald Trump’s “America First” approach. But little is known about what policy the Biden administration will adopt on the North Korean nuclear issue, the topic of greatest interest to those of us in South Korea.

The views and opinions expressed in Global Outlook are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Toda Peace Institute.