Global Outlook: Cooperative Security, Arms Control and Disarmament

Curated expert opinion on intractable contemporary issues

Global Outlook: Cooperative Security, Arms Control and Disarmament

On the Way to an Arms Race and a New Cold War?

By Herbert Wulf  |  19 March, 2021

Exactly one year ago, on 23 March at the beginning of the pandemic, UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres, called for a global cease fire. He said: “Now is the time for a collective new push for peace and reconciliation. And so I appeal for a stepped-up international effort — led by the Security Council — to achieve a global ceasefire by the end of this year ... The world needs a global ceasefire to stop all ‘hot’ conflicts. At the same time, we must do everything to avoid a new Cold War.” His urgent appeal has gone unheard.

Setting New Priorities: The EU Shifts from Civil Peace and Development Projects to Military Policies

By Herbert Wulf  |  09 March, 2021

The EU’s foreign and security policy is plagued by unclear concepts, contradictory interests and fierce controversies between its member states. At the moment, priorities are set for a stronger military and defence role. The EU as a “power of peace”, a term popular ten years ago, has been pushed aside and geopolitical ambitions moved into the foreground.

Banning Nuclear Weapons: A Role for Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium?

By Moritz Kütt, Jan Hoekema and Tom Sauer  |  28 February, 2021

The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons should be seen in Western Europe as a signal by the rest of the world to take the promise of nuclear elimination much more seriously. Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany should work together to get rid of the American nuclear weapons on our soil, and sign the Ban Treaty as soon as politically possible.

“Beyond Westlessness”: A “Rest-less” Post-Trump Order?

By Herbert Wulf  |  25 February, 2021

The Munich Security Conference (MCI) has for decades been a place where dialogue about controversial security issues is central. Complicated issues like the Iranian nuclear programme and talks between estranged neighbours, like Israel and Palestine or the USA and Russia, were on the agenda and could be discussed in public and behind closed doors. This year’s 57th conference on 19 February was totally dissimilar to the previous 56 meetings.

Advancing the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

By Tilman Ruff  |  16 February, 2021

The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) entered into legal force on 22 January 2021. It is the first multilateral nuclear disarmament treaty to be negotiated in 25 years (since the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, CTBT) and the first such treaty to enter into force in 49 years (since the Seabed Treaty which prohibits weapons of mass destruction including nuclear weapons being placed on the seabed).

NATO Allies, Don’t Dismiss the TPNW

By Tom Sauer  |  13 February, 2021

The entry into force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) on 22 January 2021 yields strong and mixed emotions. Advocates expect an acceleration of the climb to the summit of Mountain Global Zero. Opponents repeat that the nuclear-armed states will never sign the Treaty. If the nuclear-armed states are not willing to ban nuclear weapons, though, the odds are that others will not believe their promises to eliminate nuclear weapons, as required by the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT). That does not bode well for the NPT, the “cornerstone” of the nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament regime.

The views and opinions expressed in Global Outlook are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Toda Peace Institute.