Policy Briefs Books Journals

Policy Briefs on Cooperative Security, Arms Control and Disarmament

Cooperative Security, Arms Control and Disarmament Peace and Security in Northeast Asia

Rallying for a China Strategy

Policy Brief  No.112 - July, 2021

In several summit meetings in June, the US administration tried to convince European allies and other G7 members to rally for a containment strategy against China. While the three summits of the G7, NATO and US-EU demonstrated harmony, there remain reservations in Europe about subscribing to the confrontational course against China. This paper will look at the reactions in Europe and assess how successful the new US administration was in convincing the G7, NATO and the EU to join hands in countering China. While the US government is pushing hard for a joint effort, European leaders are balancing the different economic, technological, political and security interests.

Cooperative Security, Arms Control and Disarmament

Japan and the Nuclear Ban Treaty

Policy Brief  No.110 - June, 2021

Japan has made the Japan-U.S. Security Treaty the axis of its security policy, relying for much of its security on the extended deterrence of the United States. On the other hand, as the only nation to have suffered atomic bomb attacks in war, Japan has for many years taken the lead in proposing resolutions calling for the elimination of nuclear weapons. There is a considerable gap between reality and the ideal. Now, there is a new movement gathering momentum in the international community to seek international security without nuclear weapons and the TPNW has been adopted in this context. Japan would be well advised to recognise this trend as an important aspect of international reality, and examine its policy on that basis.

Cooperative Security, Arms Control and Disarmament

Stop Muddying the Waters on the Appointment of the Executive Secretary of the CTBTO

Policy Brief  No.109 - May, 2021

For the better part of a year, diplomats from more than 180 countries have been feuding over the appointment of the Executive Secretary of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) located in Vienna, alongside the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Together with the IAEA, the CTBTO contributes to preventing further proliferation of nuclear weapons and furthering nuclear disarmament. It is too important an organisation to be left to the whims of feuding States or quarrelling diplomats.

Cooperative Security, Arms Control and Disarmament

The Humanitarian Initiative and the TPNW

Policy Brief  No.104 - February, 2021

At the 2010 NPT Review Conference State parties agreed by consensus to express their “deep concern at the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons". In the following years, non-nuclear-weapon states and civil society representatives focused increasingly on the humanitarian impact and the risks associated with nuclear weapons in what became known as the Humanitarian Initiative. The latest iteration of the initiative’s joint statement in 2015 has been subscribed to by 159 States. The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) builds on the Humanitarian Initiative. This policy brief outlines the rationale of the Humanitarian Initiative which underpins the TPNW and responds to the counternarratives and critiques against the TPNW presented by nuclear-weapon states and nuclear-umbrella states.

Cooperative Security, Arms Control and Disarmament Peace and Security in Northeast Asia Contemporary Peace Research and Practice

“They Called Us Illegal. How Is It Possible?” Dissent As A Tool For Navigating Citizenship in Democratic India

Policy Brief  No.102 - February, 2021

What does citizenship mean in contemporary democratic societies as they become increasingly multicultural? Can dissent be used constructively to redefine the terms of engagement of minority groups with the state? This paper begins by recalling the grounds for political obedience in terms of the distinction between law and legitimacy. In the context of India under the leadership of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, it then briefly sketches the assertion of Hindu primacy in the 2014–19 years before examining the seminal events of 2019 and 2020, when protestors issued a clarion call on the conscience of the state to engage in dialogue with its citizens.