Policy Briefs Books Journals

Policy Briefs on Climate Change and Conflict

Climate Change and Conflict

Urban–Rural Re-Relocation as a Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Case of Tuvalu

Policy Brief  No.106 - April, 2021

This policy brief discusses customary arrangements in place in Tuvalu that provide extensive and innovative ways in which Tuvaluan people have moved to safer rural areas, both in the past and during the Covid-19 pandemic. Such peaceful urban-rural mobility is also relevant for adaptation to climate change impacts among Tuvaluan people. The authors argue that such customary practices could be prioritised in nurturing resilience in countries across the region, especially where customary links to rural areas are less strong than they are in Tuvalu.

Climate Change and Conflict

Climate Change, Relocation and Peacebuilding in Fiji: Challenges, Debates, and Ways Forward

Summary Report  No.97 - November, 2020

Climate change induced human mobility comes with considerable risks and responsibilities. This insight was the starting point for a recently held workshop on climate-change induced migration and community relocation in the Pacific Island country of Fiji. Climate change induced relocation is a highly complex ‘wicked problem.’ This Policy Brief identifies the key challenges and focuses on the most relevant findings and insights from the workshop—i.e., the need for a holistic and integrated multi-stakeholder and multi-scalar approach with the cooperation of state, civil society and community actors, and the need for an inclusive dialogue and communication between a plurality of narratives and voices to build trust. It concludes with lessons learned and policy recommendations. (The workshop ‘Comparative Learning: Climate Change, Relocation and Peacebuilding in Fiji’ was organised by Toda Peace Institute, Conciliation Resources and Transcend Oceania on 5-6 October 2020.)

Climate Change and Conflict

Climate Change and Security: Perspectives from India

Policy Brief  No.94 - October, 2020

While there is no empirical evidence yet to prove that climate change can cause conflict among and within states, there is an increasing agreement among scholars that it can aggravate existing security challenges. India’s future security in a changed climate scenario is uncertain. Tangible alteration in its climatic variables relating to temperature, sea level, and extreme weather phenomena will have far-reaching security implications. The paper seeks to analyse a range of challenges and investigate the state’s efforts to mainstream and factor in climate change within India’s larger security narrative. The paper concludes with key policy considerations to help make India better prepared to deal with the onslaught of climate change impacts before it is too late.

Climate Change and Conflict

Addressing Challenges in Climate Change Adaptation: Learning from the Narikoso Community Relocation in Fiji

Policy Brief  No.84 - August, 2020

This paper draws from the experiences of a multi-stakeholder planned relocation measure in Narikoso village, Fiji, to enhance understandings around the nature and scope of challenges in relocation processes for adaptation. Key learnings are drawn from the Narikoso case study with implications for policy and practice. This brief makes strategic and operational recommendations in areas of: promoting participatory processes; building on existing capacities and improving coordination; strengthening the inclusion of socio-cultural dynamics; improving monitoring, evaluation and learning; and securing and managing finance.

Climate Change and Conflict

Climate Change, Conflict and Crises: Lessons from Lake Chad

Policy Brief  No.83 - July, 2020

This policy brief draws on an analysis of the interlinkages of climate change and conflict in Lake Chad to make recommendations for the implementation of responses to this crisis and in other climate-affected fragile contexts beyond the Lake Chad region. The assessment of Lake Chad shows that the impacts of increasing variability and decreasing predictability in rainfall are decreasing social cohesion, leaving communities less able to cope with conflict and this, in turn, is eroding people’s resilience to climate change. Responses to such crises, where climate change and security interlink, need to take the interactions of climate change and conflict into account and be climate- and conflict-sensitive. Climate and conflict informed programming and interventions are vital to ensure responses remain effective and sustainable, and do no harm in the face of a changing climate.